Monday, November 2, 2020

'You are no longer my mother': How the election is dividing American families

 

Tim Reid, Gabriella Borter, Michael Martina
Reuters

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - When lifelong Democrat Mayra Gomez told her 21-year-old son five months ago that she was voting for Donald Trump in Tuesday's presidential election, he cut her out of his life.

"He specifically told me, 'You are no longer my mother, because you are voting for Trump'," Gomez, 41, a personal care worker in Milwaukee, told Reuters. Their last conversation was so bitter that she is not sure they can reconcile, even if Trump loses his re-election bid.

"The damage is done. In people's minds, Trump is a monster. It's sad. There are people not talking to me anymore, and I'm not sure that will change," said Gomez, who is a fan of Trump's crackdown on illegal immigrants and handling of the economy.

Gomez is not alone in thinking the bitter splits within families and among friends over Trump's tumultuous presidency will be difficult, if not impossible, to repair, even after he leaves office.

In interviews with 10 voters - five Trump supporters and five backing Democratic candidate Joe Biden - few could see the wrecked personal relationships caused by Trump's tenure fully healing, and most believed them destroyed forever.  Read more >>