Sunday, November 29, 2020

Suicide claimed more Japanese lives in October than 10 months of COVID

 
Japanese commuters make their way through Shinagawa station in Tokyo, Japan, November 13, 2020, amid the coronavirus pandemic. KIM KYUNG-HOON/REUTERS

Lucy Craft
CBS News

Tokyo — Far more Japanese people are dying of suicide, likely exacerbated by the economic and social repercussions of the pandemic, than of the COVID-19 disease itself. While Japan has managed its coronavirus epidemic far better than many nations, keeping deaths below 2,000 nationwide, provisional statistics from the National Police Agency show suicides surged to 2,153 in October alone, marking the fourth straight month of increase.

To date, more than 17,000 people have taken their own lives this year in Japan. October self-inflicted deaths were up 600 year on year, with female suicides, about a third of the total, surging over 80%.

Women, who have primary responsibility for childcare, have borne the brunt of pandemic-induced job losses and insecurity. They're also at greater risk of domestic violence, which help centers say has worsened here this year, as it has around the world.  Read more >>